Off The Record Manchester

Off The Record is a new music event and conference in Manchester put together by some lovely people who are passionate about the effect the music industry can have on us here in the North West. 

I can’t remember exactly how many years ago it was when I first went to Manchester for the In the City music conference/gig/piss up. I didn’t drink a whole lot or even go to the gigs much but I did go to the conference a few times. I saw Tony Wilson once. Then once again in Paris but now isn’t the time. Suffice it to say that for all his eccentricisms (not a word) he had a huge effect on Manchester and the North West and his opinions (of which he had many) still resonate today.

tony-wilson-with-buzzcocks

Tony Wilson avec Buzzcock

I was running a telecoms business but with a keen interest in technology and how music would fare as the internet boomed.

I’m not sure why I went to In the City in retrospect. I’d take a minidisc recorder and interview as many people as I could find about the music industry. It has always been music I go to for solace, for inspiration, for peace or for noise. I’d put the interviews on a real audio server somewhere. It was kind of practising for my future as yet unknown radio career.

Off The Record – Manchester

Off the Record is on Friday 4th November 2016 and will be a whole bunch of people talking about ideas and going to watch new bands and artists across 6 iconic Manchester venues. I know why I am going to this music event. It’s because despite the “democratisation” of music production and distribution that has turned the world upside down in the last ten years or more this revolutionary change has, I fear, not entirely helped new young artists.

I am interested in talking to some of the music biz people that will be there. I want to see how they view the new music landscape just now but I also want to talk to artists, as I do on BBC Introducing Lancashire (the programme I present.) How do they see the industry? Do they think about it much? Or are they just creating music in the hope that someone will drag them from obscurity with no strings attached? Sadly there are always strings and it’s usually those record company strings and the strange dark relationships between manager and label that destroy the very talent they are claim to support.

bbc intro state of the industry event .jpg

BBC Introducing Lancashire “State of the music industry event” 

Why you should come to Off the Record

Book your ticket now. Go on do it. The reason I think you should is that I see the huge commercial interests desperately clinging on to antiquated business models of music and that has to change. I want you to go if you are interested in any aspect of the music industry. Mainly so I can interview you for the radio and for a book what I is writing.

I don’t have any financial interest in it. I have been invited to be on a panel and to suggest artists to play at the gigs but I’m going because I want to support anything in the North West that can bring us all together and hey, maybe find new ways of supporting and nurturing young new musical type peeps.

That has been the focus of what I’ve been doing with BBC Introducing and in the social enterprises I have been involved with for the last ten years and more and I am chuffed to bits to be asked to attend.

Come and find me if you have a view on the industry and how we can shape it for a better future. Also tell me what you think the BBC could do better to add to my long, long list of suggestions.

I present BBC Introducing Lancashire the new music programme and gob off about the music industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fylde Community Radio License

For years now I’ve been working with others to bring a community radio station to the Fylde Coast. If you don’t understand how great that would be for the area then stop reading now and go and watch Dave.

Enlightened

I first worked with our local hospital trust on community radio when a forward thinking Chief Executive asked me to get involved. They were concerned about their hospital radio station and wanted me to sort that out and bid for a community FM radio license; which would work for the good of the hospital and also serve their wider community.

A bid was put together to Ofcom which eventually delivered us a community radio license. I then built, with others, a sizeable group of volunteers who worked hard to make the changes needed to uphold the standards of an Ofcom licensed radio station.

Malheureusement

Unfortunately, just as all that hard work came to fruition, the senior management changed at the trust and after some discussions we suddenly had no studio.

Ofcom

Sadly, today I have handed back the community radio licence to Ofcom.

The hospital has an internal radio station again which is good to see but a great opportunity has been lost for Blackpool and The Fylde Coast.

I’ve looked at this from both sides now

I am looking at this whole subject of how Blackpool can change itself another way now and am already exploring some really exciting ways that the arts with journalism can impact here.

Thank you

I must thank all the people I have worked with in the last few years including those who didn’t share my vision. It’s taught me a lot and that’s a total bonus.